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New Eye of Microscope1 2 3
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Scientific Genius Dies
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RIFE/CRANE ORIGINAL FREQUENCIES
Adapt your rife machine to run Hulda Clarks frequencies
Wrap your body in a magnetic field
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Frequency List 5
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Rife Operator sued
 
 
 
 

 

 

Lakhovsky's
Multiple Wave Oscillator
Lakhovsky Article
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The Original Multiple Wave Oscillator
What is a Multi-Wave-Oscillator
and What can it do for me ?
THE RADIO CELLULO-OSCILLATOR
 A NEW METHOD
THE LENGTH OF TREATMENT
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Worring Times
"Curing Cancer With Ultra Radio Frequencies"
Frequency Analysis of the Lakhovsky Multiple Wave Oscillator from 20 Hz to 20 GHz
Treatment Time Protocols
Lakhovsky's central idea is this:
Using the Lakhovsky Multi-Wave Oscillator for Healing
Lakhovsky's Multi-Wave Oscillator (MWO)
Another Perspective
by Ed Wahler
RADIATIONS AND WAVES
The Secret of Life
The Electromagnetic Nature Of Life
Treatment Time Protocols
living cells are batteries
Extraordinary healings
The Secret of Life: Electricity, Radiation and Your Body contents
Cells work electricaly
Lakhovsky's Discovery
 
Bioelectrical Universe
What is frequency technology?
The man behind the technology-Ed Skilling
ELECTROMAGNETIC EFFECTS ON HUMAN BEHAVIOR
Short video clip
The Waves That Heal
Central Idea
Cell Battery
 
 
 
 
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Essiac Tea
Gerson
Lung Cancer
 



 
 
WHY SUGAR IS TOXIC TO THE BODY
FLUORIDE FANTASIES
pH Values of Various Foods
The Third Element of the Blood
 
Aspirin
V
L Arginine
Recommended "Schizophrenia" Nutritional and Dietary Regimen
Well-Done Meat and Smoking Make a Deadly Combo
THE TEN METABOLIC TYPES CHART
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Stupid Arrogance: So-Called "Naturopathic Physicians"...
 
 
 
Fibromyalgia
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Rife Machine Operator Sued


The Attorneys General of Wisconsin and Minnesota have sued to stop an unlicensed woman, Shelvie Rettmann, of Prior Lake, Minnesota, from representing that she can cure cancer.

In December 1997, Wisconsin Attorney General James Doyle announced that a Wisconsin resident who was diagnosed with advanced colon and liver cancer used Rettmann's services after being told that she could cure the woman's cancer [1]. Although medical doctors had recommended chemotherapy, Rettmann had advised her otherwise.

At their first meeting, Rettmann allegedly photographed the woman and her daughter with a Polaroid camera and put the photos in a cup attached to a radionics machine. After telling the mother that she had colon and blood cancer and the daughter that she had breast cancer, Rettmann allegedly advised both to have treatments with a Rife Frequency Generator, a special diet, dietary supplements, a regimen of baths, and foot zoning (a type of foot massage claimed to break up accumulated deposits at the end of foot nerve endings in order to help heal the body).

Both women underwent multiple treatments. The mother paid Rettmann a total of $1,778.85, and the daughter paid $495.30. At their final meeting, Rettmann told the mother that she had been cured. Within a month, however, the mother experienced severe pain that caused her to see a physician. She was told that her cancer had progressed considerably and that the prognosis was hopeless. She died soon after that assessment. The daughter was subsequently examined by her personal physician and told that she did not have breast cancer.

Rettmann allegedly conducted seminars about her products in Ellsworth. Consumers who used her services were allegedly told that she had successfully treated as many as 1,000 patients.

According to Doyle, Rettmann told patients that the government did not want to cure cancer and did not understand what she was doing. She also allegedly provided her customers books and videotapes which claimed that there was a conspiracy to keep the Rife generator from being approved by the FDA and that the government was wrong at Waco and the Oklahoma City bombing. She had been selling the Rife device for about $3,500 and the radionics machine for $1,700. She also sold the nutritional supplements she recommended.

In September 1998, Minnesota Attorney General Hubert Humphrey III announced that his office had obtained a judgment against Rettmann [2]. The Scott County District Court found that Rettmann had violated state laws prohibiting deceptive trade practices and consumer fraud by selling medical devices without FDA approval and telling consumers she could cure cancer with a "Rife generator" machine, a "radionics" device, "foot-zoning" treatments, and various vitamins and supplements. During a hearing, the FDA provided support and expert testimony confirming that the devices Rettmann sold were illegal.

The judge concluded: (a) Rettmann had sold over $7,000 worth of bogus medical devices, treatments and products to an Anoka, Minnesota, man with pancreatic and liver cancer; (b) Rettmann promised she could cure the consumer's cancer faster if he stopped taking chemotherapy treatments; (c) relying on Rettmann's promise, the man stopped chemotherapy after a single session and died four months later; and (d) Rettmann also violated Minnesota consumer laws by saying she was licensed to practice "foot zoning" (essentially foot massage) and she could cure cancer through "foot zoning" treatments. Minnesota does not license the practice of "foot zoning." The judge prohibited Rettmann from providing health care services or products, ordered refunds upon request to injured consumers, and imposed civil penalties of $50,000 plus the state's attorney fees and costs.

Rettman filed for bankruptcy in July 1998. However, the court ruled that the State was still entitled to obtain a judgment. Consumers who paid Rettmann for health care services or products since June 25, 1991 should contact the Minnesota Attorney General's Office by calling (651) 296-3353, or 1-800-657-3787, TYY (651) 297-7206 or 1-800-366-4812. Because Rettmann is in bankruptcy there is no assurance of refunds. However, contacting the Attorney General's Office will preserve that possibility.

Background History
Radionics is a pseudoscience based on the notion that diseases can be diagnosed and treated by tuning in on radio-like frequencies allegedly emitted by disease-causing agents and diseased organs. The theory behind it originated with Albert Abrams, M.D. (1864-1924), who developed thirteen devices claimed to detect such frequencies and/or cure people by matching their frequencies. Abrams made millions leasing his devices and was considered by the American Medical Association to be the "dean of gadget quacks." He claimed:

All parts of the body emit electrical impulses with different frequencies that vary with health and disease.
Illnesses -- as well as age, sex, religion, and location -- could be diagnosed by "tuning in" on patient's blood or handwriting samples with one of his devices.
Diseases could be treated by feeding proper vibrations into the body with another of his devices.
During the 1950s, an FDA investigation showed that some of Abrams's devices produced magnetism from circuits like that of an electric doorbell, whereas others had short-wave circuits resembling those of a taxicab transmitter [3]. Similar devices have been produced by many others and are still marketed today.

One of Abrams's many imitators was Royal Raymond Rife (1888-1971), an American who claimed that cancer was caused by bacteria. During the 1920s, he claimed to have developed a powerful microscope that could detect living microbes by the color of auras emitted by their vibratory rates. His Rife Frequency Generator allegedly generates radio waves with precisely the same frequency, causing the offending bacteria to shatter in the same manner as a crystal glass breaks in response to the voice of an opera singer. The American Cancer Society has pointed out that although sound waves can produce vibrations that break glass, radio waves at the power level emitted a Rife generator do not have sufficient energy to destroy bacteria [4].

Additional information about Rife's ideas is available from proponents such as the Royal Rife Research Society, Rife Technologies, Horizon Technology, JW Labs, and the International Center for Nutritional Research, some of which market a Rife Generator. Treatment with the device is available at clinics in Mexico and Canada. The bottom line, however, is that radionics devices have no value for diagnosing or treating anything.

For Additional Information on Radionics Devices
Albert Abrams, M.D.
Heil Eugene Crum, M.D.
Ruth Drown, D.C.
References
Wisconsin Department of Justice. Attorney General files suit against marketer of cancer cures; Doyle says machines and treatments are medical quackery. News release, December 2, 1997.
Wisconsin Department of Justice. Humphrey obtains judgment to stop bogus cancer cures. News release, September 30, 1998.
Janssen W. The gadgeteers. In Barrett S, Jarvis WT, editors. The Health Robbers: A Close Look at Quackery in America. Amherst, N.Y.: Prometheus Books, 1993:321-335.
American Cancer Society. Questionable methods of cancer management: Electronic devices. CA -- A Cancer Journal for Clinicians 44:115-127, 1994.

 

 

Portable Rife

Desk Top Rife


"Never must the physician say, the disease is incurable. By that admission he denies God,
our Creator; he doubts Nature with her profuseness of hidden powers and mysteries."

Quoted from the last page of the book "THE MEDICAL FOLLIES" printed
in 1925 and written by Morris Fishbein, M.D.
Editor of the Journal of the American Medical Association

Wonder What Happened!
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